Last edited by Zulugore
Tuesday, February 4, 2020 | History

4 edition of Names and nature in Plato"s Cratylus found in the catalog.

Names and nature in Plato"s Cratylus

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  • 25 Currently reading

Published by Routledge in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Plato.,
  • Names.,
  • Naturalness (Linguistics),
  • Language and languages -- Philosophy.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 199-206) and indexes.

    StatementRachel Barney.
    SeriesStudies in philosophy, Studies in philosophy (New York, N.Y.)
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsB367 .B37 2001
    The Physical Object
    Paginationvii, 227 p. ;
    Number of Pages227
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL6796625M
    ISBN 100815339658
    LC Control Number00068419

    I dare say that you be right, Hermogenes: let us see;- Your meaning is, that the name of each thing is only that which anybody agrees to call it? Why, Hermogenes, I do not as yet see myself; and do you? For likeness is always required too, and convention is subservient to it — For there is none who is more the author of life to us and to all, than the lord and king of all. The true way is to have the assistance of those who know, and you must pay them well both in money and in thanks; these are the Sophists, of whom your brother, Callias, has- rather dearly- bought the reputation of wisdom.

    Did who follows names in the search after things, and analy-you ever observe in speaking that all the words which ses their meaning, is in great danger of being deceived? And therefore the Goddess may be truly called Pherepaphe Pherepaphaor some name like it, because she touches that which is tou pheromenon ephaptomeneherein showing her wisdom. And when the weaver uses the shuttle, whose work will he be using well? For one of them says that justice is the sun, and that he only is the piercing diaionta and burning kaonta element which is the guardian of nature.

    No, indeed, I never thought of it. And this is the best of all principles; and the next best is to say, as in prayers, that we will call them by any sort of kind names or patronymics which they like, because we do not know of any other. Another says, "No, not fire in the abstract, but the abstraction of heat in the fire. If people and things have some fixed being of their own, it follows that this is also true of the actions performed in relation to them. Have you remarked this fact?


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Names and nature in Platos Cratylus book

Sedley makes an insightful comparison with modern acronyms 36 : an acronym is a name formed out of letters from a longer phrase that encapsulates its meaning; if we decode these components correctly, we can recover the original intent of the namegivers, and hence their beliefs about the object named.

However, the reason our souls do not escape from him is because they are bound to him by the strongest of desires, namely, the desire to associate with someone who can make us a better person. Enough of this, which is all that we who know nothing can affirm. For example, Homer says that the river god who fought with Hephaestus is called Xanthos by the gods and Skamandros by men.

Very good: then a name is an instrument? When he declares that your name is not really Hermogenes, I suspect that he is only making fun of you;- he means to say that you are no true son of Hermes, because you are always looking after a fortune and never in luck.

Names and Nature in Plato's Cratylus

For most of these in their explanations of the poet, assert that he meant by Athene "mind" nous and "intelligence" dianoiaand the maker of names appears to have had a singular notion about her; and indeed calls her by a still higher title, "divine intelligence" Thou noesisas though he would say: This is she who has the mind of God Theonoa ;- using a as a dialectical variety e, and taking away i and s.

I should say that every part is true. And if, on the other hand, wisdom and folly are really distinguishable, you will allow, I think, that the assertion of Protagoras can hardly be correct. What may we suppose him to have meant who gave the name Hestia? Yes, that will be well. Well, now, let me take an instance;- suppose that I call a man a horse or a horse a man, you mean to say that a man will be rightly called a horse by me individually, and rightly called a man by the rest of the world; and a horse again would be rightly called a man by me and a horse by the world:- that is your meaning?

Let us consider:- does he not himself suggest a very good reason, when he says, For he alone defended their city and long walls? Wherefore we are right in calling him Zena and Dia, which are one name, although divided, meaning the God through whom all creatures always have life di on zen aei pasi tois zosin uparchei.

No, I cannot; and I would not try even if I could, because I think that you are the more likely to succeed. Ademollo suggests that Plato initially forces errors and fallacious inferences on Socrates as an invitation to the reading audience to identify the various mistakes behind the naturalist position.

If the original namegivers were in a privileged epistemic position, then, whether or not they were infallible, recovering their beliefs would be useful for finding about the world.

Take, for example, the word Dii Philos; in order to convert this from a sentence into a noun, we omit one of the iotas and sound the middle syllable grave instead of acute; as, on the other hand, letters are sometimes inserted in words instead of being omitted, and the acute takes the place of the grave.

But Cratylus cannot be right, then, that the linguistic expressions analyzed by Socrates must be naturally correct to serve as names at all. Once that threshold is crossed, a name can be evaluated with an apparently new criterion as a more or less accurate, finer or worse, imitation of its referent.

Is the giving of the names of streams to both of them purely accidental? Only the skilled. So Socrates' preference, at the end of the Cratylus, for inquiry into things over inquiry into names would make good sense. Surely, we must not leave off until we find out their meaning. Yes; what other answer is possible?In Plato: Early dialogues.

The Cratylus (which some do not place in this group of works) discusses the question of whether names are correct by virtue of convention or nature.

The Crito shows Socrates in prison, discussing why he chooses not to escape before the death sentence is carried out. Read More; origins of language. "It is remarkable that Reeve's is the first new English translation since Fowler's Loeb edition of Fortunately, Reeve has done an excellent job.

His version is not slavishly literal but is in general very accurate. It is also very clear and readable.

Reeve is particularly to be congratulated for having produced versions of some of the more torturous passages, which are not only 4/5(1). Aug 01,  · Plato -- the complete book list. Browse author series lists, sequels, pseudonyms, synopses, book covers, ratings and awards.

The Dialogues of Plato - Cratylus. Mar / General Fiction; The Dialogues of Plato - Euthydemus. The Ion is the shortest, or nearly the shortest, of all the writings which bear the name of Plato, and is not. May 05,  · Cratylus: Plato’s Dialogue on Language.

Euthydemus. Since Hermogenes accepts that neither account of things is correct, he must admit that there is a fixed nature, or essence, to things and he further admits that there must also be a correlative correct action to each essence or nature.

The gods have infinitely more correct names, as. Plato and the Literary Tradition, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Cratylus: Plato’s Dialogue on Language

Mackenzie, M. M.,‘Putting the Cratylus in its place’, Classical Quarterly, – Robinson, R.,‘The theory of names in Plato’s Cratylus’ and ‘A criticism of Plato’s Cratylus’, in. Plato's Cratylus is a brilliant but enigmatic dialogue. It bears on a topic, the relation of language to knowledge, which has never ceased to be of central philosophical importance, but tackles it in ways which at times look alien to us.

In this reappraisal of the dialogue, Professor Sedley argues that the etymologies which take up well over half of it are not an embarrassing lapse or semi 3/5(1).